Unprotect an excel sheet without password

Unprotect an excel sheet without password

How to Unprotect an excel sheet without password

How to Unprotect an excel sheet without password

THis document will tel you how to unprotect an excel spread sheet without having the password

This procedure works in Excel 2010 and earlier but in Excel 2013 this will not work.

 

In case of a password protect worksheet you are unable to Edit the data on the Excel Sheet. If you do not Remember the Password or do not know the password to unprotect the sheet just follow the below simple steps.

excel1

Press ALT +  F11 or click on View Code in Developers Tabs

Excel2

In the Above White Space Enter the below Code. Do not change the code just copy paste:

Sub PasswordBreaker()
‘Breaks worksheet password protection.
Dim i As Integer, j As Integer, k As Integer
Dim l As Integer, m As Integer, n As Integer
Dim i1 As Integer, i2 As Integer, i3 As Integer
Dim i4 As Integer, i5 As Integer, i6 As Integer
On Error Resume Next
For i = 65 To 66: For j = 65 To 66: For k = 65 To 66
For l = 65 To 66: For m = 65 To 66: For i1 = 65 To 66
For i2 = 65 To 66: For i3 = 65 To 66: For i4 = 65 To 66
For i5 = 65 To 66: For i6 = 65 To 66: For n = 32 To 126
ActiveSheet.Unprotect Chr(i) & Chr(j) & Chr(k) & _
Chr(l) & Chr(m) & Chr(i1) & Chr(i2) & Chr(i3) & _
Chr(i4) & Chr(i5) & Chr(i6) & Chr(n)
If ActiveSheet.ProtectContents = False Then
MsgBox “One usable password is ” & Chr(i) & Chr(j) & _
Chr(k) & Chr(l) & Chr(m) & Chr(i1) & Chr(i2) & _
Chr(i3) & Chr(i4) & Chr(i5) & Chr(i6) & Chr(n)
Exit Sub
End If
Next: Next: Next: Next: Next: Next
Next: Next: Next: Next: Next: Next
End Sub

Now Click on the Run Button or press F5:

Excel3
And there you go the sheet is unprotected for you now. Also you would be getting a message in the pop up window.

This Message is contains the password which can be used to unprotect the other sheets in the same workbook.

Excel4

Unprotect an excel sheet without password

PlayBox HD For PC Download on Windows

PlayBox HD For PC Download on Windows

this article copied from this source

 

Playbox HD is an awesomely designed application for watching TV programs and films. Follow this peculiar tutorial to download PlayBox for PC on Microsoft Windows. It can be downloaded on Windows 8.1, Windows 7/8 and also on Windows 10. You may have used thisPlayBox for Android, but watching the videos on laptop will surely make  It has so many perplex characteristics and as a result it has driven the huge popularity.

[adinserter block=”1″]

Play Box is an fabulous and very well working application which is avail to download to Android, PC and also to iOS. Yes, you can get PlayBox HD for iPad/iPhone also. This will play all movies, cartoons and shows with no buffering. If you’ve good Internet connection, you can savor them more. Various quality options are there and opt any of them to start watching your video. I’m saying so much about this app because, in this session I am willing to present you the way to bring Play Box HD for PC.

playbox for pc

PlayBox for PC Download to Windows 7/8.1/8

Just perform the below points as it is in your laptop and it takes just 2 minutes to install the app.

  • As you wanna make PlayBox download to your PC, you must have installed an emulator in laptop.
  • That software or App player is BlueStacks and you can get it here.
  • It’ll take no time to download. After downloading, do install it.
  • Now, fetch the android apk of Play Box, below is the link for it.

[adinserter block=”1″]

PlayBox HD Latest APK

  • Later completing the download, just leave it like that.
  • Now open settings of your mobile and step into Security.
  • Enable the foremost option which lets you install unknown source applications.
  • Afterwards applying this change, run the apk file with BlueStacks software that you fetched a little while ago.
  • It’ll get installed in Bluestack and to find where the app is located in that software, move onto the All Apps and you’ll see the app.
  • That’s it, I hope you’ve accomplished the process without any issues.

This is the entire process to download PlayBox for PC, I believe you’ve acquired enough info to perform the phenomena. If you would like to inquire any sort of stuff about PlayBox HD app, please do post a comment in here. We are very glad to assist you and finally share this post in the popular social media networks with your friends and family members to let them know considering this perplex movies application, apps like Playbox.

 

 

Unprotect an excel sheet without password

Subnetting and supernetting IP networks

Build Your Skills: Subnetting and supernetting IP networks

Covers procedures involved in subnetting Class A, B, and C networks, as well as those involved in supernetting Class C networks

Build Your Skills: Subnetting and supernetting IP networks

this article has been copied from this source

related article is Difference between Subnets and Supernet8 Steps to Understanding IP Subnetting or IP Subnetting Made Simple

In the past few years, as the number of hosts connected to the Internet has grown beyond expectations, it has become apparent that the present IP addressing scheme imposes limitations on network size. This has led to two concepts for IP network administrators: subnetting and supernetting.

When a large network is subnetted, the network is divided into at least two smaller subnetworks, with each subnetwork (subnet) having its own subnetwork address (subnetid). When supernetting is performed, several small Class C networks are combined to create one large network, or supernetwork.

In this Daily Drill Down, I’ll cover the procedures involved in subnetting Class A, B, and C networks as well as those involved in supernetting Class C networks.

Subnetting
Each IP address is 32 bits long. A portion of each IP address represents the network (netid), and a portion represents the host (hostid). This means that IP addressing imposes its own hierarchy to follow for reaching any host on an internetwork. The network is first reached using the netid, and then the specific host is reached using the hostid. This addressing scheme approaches all networks as if they are just one large network with several hosts. If this addressing were the only one allowed, there would be two serious limitations on network design:

  • Hosts on the network could not be organized into groups. With this scheme, you could not create separate networks for departments within an organization.
  • All networks would be at the same level. If all hosts were connected to the same physical network, bandwidth would be quickly consumed during peak usage hours. All users would be sending and receiving over the same cable.

The effect of having all hosts connected to the same physical network is shown in Figure A.

Figure A
In this example, all our hosts are connected to the same physical network.

In Figure A, the hosts are all connected to the same Class B network, with the network address 143.15.3.0. In a Class B network, there are up to 65,534 hosts. If all of these hosts used the same cable, it would be extremely difficult for users to send and receive information efficiently.

A possible solution is to divide one large network into several smaller networks through subnetting. Figure B shows the effect of dividing a large Class B network into three smaller subnetworks.

Figure B
Now the Marketing and Finance departments each have their own subnets: 143.15.4.0 and 143.15.5.0, respectively.

In Figure B, the Marketing and Finance departments now each have their own subnets: 143.15.4.0, and 143.15.5.0, respectively. In addition, the router now uses two interfaces—143.15.4.100 and 143.15.5.100—to provide a separate gateway for each subnetwork. The effect of subnetting the original large Class B network is to reduce the network congestion caused by having all hosts on one large network use the same physical cable. In addition, isolating network problems now becomes easier because problems can be isolated within a smaller subnetwork.

To hosts outside the organization, the effect of subnetting is invisible. All IP information destined for either the 143.15.4.0 subnet or the 143.15.5.0 subnet still goes to the same router. However, when information arriving from the Internet reaches the router, the destination IP address is interpreted differently.

The router now knows that the original 142.15.3.0 network has been subnetted into two smaller subnetworks. The router interprets IP address information in the following manner:

  • The first two bits, or octets, 143.15, are used to define the netid (143.15.0.0 or 143.15.4.0).
  • The third octet is used to define the subnetid (143.15.4.0 or 143.15.5.0).
  • The last octet is used to define the hostid—for example, 143.15.5.31.

Subnetting a large network immediately creates a third level of hierarchy to the IP address format. So now there are three levels:

  • Netid—Defines the entire site within the organization
  • Subnetid—Defines the physical subnetwork
  • Hostid—Identifies each host connected to the subnetwork

This also means that when IP information is sent to the network from the Internet, three steps are involved in routing the information:

  1. The IP packet is delivered to the site (143.15.0.0).
  2. The packet is forwarded to the correct subnetwork (143.15.4.0 or 143.15.5.0).
  3. The packet is delivered to the correct host.

Let’s take a look at a Class B network with and without subnetting:

Class B network without subnetting
Netid Hostid
143.15 .3.20
Class B network with subnetting
Netid Subnetid Hostid
143.15 .3 .20

Subnet masking
Subnet masking is a process used to extract the physical network address from an IP address. Actually, masking may be done whether there is a subnet in place or not. If there is no subnet, masking extracts the network address. If there is a subnet, masking extracts the subnetwork address.

The first step in understanding subnet masking is to understand how a netmask is created. For example, let’s assume we want to determine the netmask for the 192.168.1.0 network. In binary format, 192.168.1.0 is written as:
11000000.10101000.00000001.00000000

The three leftmost bits are 110, so we know that this is a Class C address. This means that the first 24 bits are used for the netid and the last 8 bits are used for the hostid. To determine the netmask, set all the network bits to 1 and all the host bits to zero. In binary format, this is:
11111111.11111111.11111111.00000000

Converted to decimal format, this gives us a netmask of 255.255.255.0. To determine the netmask, just remember that all the netid bits are set to 1 and all the hostid bits are set to 0. Let’s look at another example. A network has 10.0.0.0 for the netid. In binary format, this address translates to:
00001010.00000000.00000000.00000000

When we set all the network bits to 1 and all the host bits to 0, we get:
11111111.00000000.00000000.00000000

Bitwise AND operations
The principle behind bitwise AND operations is simple: If the first operator has a value of 1 (true) AND the second operator has a value of 1 (true), then the value returned is true. In all other cases, the value is false (0).

Let’s look at an example. To determine if the IP address 192.168.1.130 belongs to the local network—which has a netmask of 255.255.255.128—the computer sending the IP packet performs the following:
11000000.10101000.00000001.10000010 (which is 192.168.1.130)
11111111.11111111.11111111.10000000(which is 255.255.255.128)
___________________________________
11000000.10101000.00000001.10000000 (which is 192.168.1.128)

In this case, the bitwise operation returns a network address of 192.168.1.128 for the IP address 192.168.1.130.

Now let’s look at another example. When a Class C network is left intact, the netmask is 255.255.255.0. If we want to create two individual subnets, we must first create a netmask.

This is accomplished by setting one or more bits in the host portion of the default mask to 1. To divide the 192.168.1.0 network into two equal subnetworks, we set the most significant (leftmost) bit in the host portion of the address to 1. This gives us:
11111111.11111111.1111111.10000000 (which is 255.255.255.128)

This produces a new netmask that divides the original 192.168.1.0 network into two equal subnetworks: the 192.168.1.0 subnet and the 192.168.1.128 subnet. Both networks use the same netmask: 192.168.1.128. Now let’s try another bitwise AND operation. Given the IP address 192.168.1.21, let’s determine which network this address belongs to by performing a bitwise AND operation:
11000000.10101000.00000001.00010101 (which is 192.168.1.21)
11111111.11111111.11111111.10000000 (which is 255.255.255.128)
_________________________________
11000000.10101000.00000001.00000000 (which is 192.168.1.0)

The bitwise AND operation returns a network address of 192.168.1.0 for the IP address 192.168.1.21.

Now try the same operation for the IP address 192.168.1.140:
11000000.10101000.00000001.10001100 (which is 192.168.1.140)
11111111.11111111.11111111.10000000 (which is 192.168.1.128)
__________________________________
11000000.10101000.00000001.10000000 (which is 192.168.1.128)

For the IP address 192.168.1.140, the bitwise AND operation returns a network address of 192.168.1.128.

To determine how many subnets can be created from a full Class A, B, or C network, use the formula:
Number of subnets = 2x – 2

where x represents the number of host bits.

For example, let’s say 8 host bits are available in a Class C network. Although it would appear that there are 27, or 128 possible subnets, we also lose some IP addresses for broadcast and network addresses. Because of these practical limitations, most administrators limit Class C subnetting to 16 subnets.

Linux comes with a very useful utility for determining which network an IP address belongs to. This tool is capable of calculating the broadcast address, netmask, network, and network address for any given IP address/netmask combination. The ipcalc tool is easy to use. Simply enter the IP address and subnet mask into ipcalc. For example, to determine the broadcast and network addresses for the IP address 192.168.1.1 with a netmask of 255.255.255.128, use the command:
ipcalc –network –broadcast 192.168.1.1 255.255.255.128

The ipcalc command would then return the following values:
BROADCAST=192.168.1.127
NETWORK=192.168.1.0

Other IP calculator tools include a tool for the Palm Pilot (called IPcalc) andIPCalc for the Windows operating system.

Subnetting examples
Below, I have outlined examples for subnetting Class A, B, and C networks. In each example, I offer a table of how the network looks with the original subnet masking and then with the new subnet masking.

Subnetting Class A networks
First, remember some key points about Class A networks:

  • The first byte in a Class A address is the netid.
  • The remaining three bytes are the hostid.
  • A Class A network may have up to 16,777,214 (224 minus 2) hosts connected to the network.

For this example, we use an organization with a Class A network with the network address 33.0.0.0. There is now a requirement for at least 1,000 subnetworks. Using this information, the administrator can make the following decisions:

  • The organization will actually require at least 1,002 subnetworks to account for subnetids composed of all 1’s and all 0’s.
  • The minimum number bits that may be assigned for subnetting is 10 (210 = 1,024).
  • This leaves 16 bits for use as hostids.
  • IP addresses with all subnetid bits set to 1 and all subnetid bits set to 0 are reserved.
  • This leaves a maximum of 16,382 (214 minus 2) hosts connected to each subnetwork.
Class A network with original subnet masking
Netid Hostid
00100001. 00000000.00000000.00000000
Default mask 255.0.0.0
Class A network with new subnet masking
Netid Subnetid Hostid
00100001. 11111111.11 000000.0000000
New Subnet Mask 255.255.192.0

Now we identify the subnetworks. The subnetid actually contains 10 bits. The last two bits in the subnetid belong to the third byte of the original IP address. The last two bits represent 26, or 64, and 27, or 128. This means that the first subnetid available for use is 33.0.64.0, and the last subnetid available is 33.255.128.0.

Now we’ll show the network with the default netmask and with subnet masking applied.

Class A network with the default netmask
First subnet This network IP First address Last address Broadcast
33.0.64.0 33.0.64.0 33.0.60.1 33.0.60.254 33.0.60.255
Class A network with subnet masking applied
Last subnet This network IP First address Last address Broadcast
33.255.128.0 33.0.128.0 33.0.128.1 33.0.128.254 33.0.128.255

Subnetting Class B networks
A Class B network uses the first two bytes of the IP address for the netid and the last two bytes for the hostid. A Class B network can have one large physical network with up to 65,534 (216 minus 2) hosts. Let’s look at an example of subnetting on a large Class B network.

Let’s assume your company has obtained a Class B network with the network address 130.20.0.0, and it now needs a minimum of 12 subnetworks. Let’s determine the subnet mask and configuration for each subnet.

In this example, your company will need a minimum of 14 subnets. This accounts for the 12 required subnets, plus two subnets reserved for special purposes. This requires the new subnet mask to have an additional 4 bits (24 = 16). Here is the Class B network before and after the subnet mask is applied.

Class B network with original subnet mask
Netid Hostid
10000001.00010100. 00000000.00000000
Subnet mask = 255.255.0.0
Class B network with new subnet mask
Netid Subnetid Hostid
10000001.00010100 1111 0000.00000000
New subnet mask = 255.255.240.0

Using the new subnet mask 255.255.240.0, the network is now divided into 16 subnetworks, with two network addresses reserved for special purposes. This new subnet mask leaves 12 bits to define hostids on each subnet. The new configuration allows for 4,096 (212) hosts to be connected to each subnetwork. With the first address reserved to define the subnetwork and the last address reserved for a broadcast address, there may actually be a maximum of 4,094 hosts on each subnet. The range of netids used for the new subnetted network is from 130.20.16.0 to 130.20.224.0.

In the example below, I’m subnetting a Class B network into 14 smaller subnets. This forces me to use four bits (1111) in the new subnet mask. This creates 16 new subnets. Two of these subnets are reserved: one subnet, with all subnetid bits set to 1, and another subnet with all subnetid bits set to 0.

First subnet Subnet address First address Last address Broadcast
130.20.16.0 130.20.16.0 130.20.16.1 130.20.31.254 130.20.31.255
Last subnet Subnet address First address Last address Broadcast
130.20.224.0 130.20.224.0 130.20.224.1 130.20.239.254 130.30.239.255

Subnetting Class C networks
Class C IP addresses use three bytes for the netid and one byte for the hostid. A business using a class address may have one physical network and up to 254 (28 minus 2) hosts connected to that network. The company could also subnet the one large physical network into several smaller subnetworks. Let’s look at an example of subnetting a Class C network.

A business has been granted the Class C address 181.60.30.0. To make this address useful, the company will need to subnet this address into six subnetworks.

Solution
The organization will actually require eight subnetworks, six physical subnets, and two reserved addresses. This means there should be an additional three bits to the subnet mask (23 = 8). This will allow for six physical subnetworks and an additional two subnetids reserved for special addresses. With five bits remaining for hostids, there may be up to 32 hosts connected to each subnet. However, hostids with all bits set to 0 and hostids with all bits set to 1 are reserved, so the actual limit for each subnet is 30 hosts. The first available subnetid address is 180.60.33.32, and the last available subnetid address is 180.60.30.192.

Now we’ll work on a Class C network with and without subnet masking:

Class C network with original subnet mask
Netid Hostid
10110101.00111100. 00100001.00000000
Subnet mask = 255.255.255.0
Class C network with new subnet mask
Netid Subnetid Hostid
10110101.00111100.00100001. 111 00000
New subnet mask = 255.255.255.224

In Figure C, we show the original class network subnetted into six smaller subnetworks.

Figure C
The original class network is subnetted into six smaller subnetworks.

Conclusion
The TCP/IP protocol suite provides the basis for Internetworking. A thorough knowledge of TCP/IP is essential to managing computer networks—and almost any other device connected to the Internet. In this Daily Drill Down, we covered the procedures for subnetting TCP/IP networks. We looked at the disadvantages of maintaining large IP networks and the advantages gained from subnetting these networks. In addition, we provided an introduction to creating subnet masks and performing bitwise AND operations to determine the network address from any given IP address. We provided subnetting examples for Class A, B, and C networks.

Difference between Subnets and Supernet

Difference between Subnets and Supernet

this article has been taken from this source

Subnetting vs Supernetting

Subnetting is the process of dividing an IP network in to sub divisions called subnets. Computers belonging to a sub network have a common group of most-significant bits in their IP addresses. So, this would break the IP address in to two parts (logically), as the network prefix and the rest field. Supernetting is the process of combining several sub networks, which have a common Classless Inter-Domain Routing (CIDR) routing prefix. Suppernetting is also called route aggregation or route summarization.

 

What is Subnetting?

Process of dividing an IP network in to sub divisions is called subnetting. Subnetting divides an IP address in to two parts as the network (or routing prefix) and the rest field (which is used to identify a specific host). CIDR notation is used to write a routing prefix. This notation uses a slash (/) to separate the network starting address and the length of the network prefix (in bits). For example, in IPv4, 192.60.128.0/22 indicates that 22 bits are allocated for the network prefix and the remaining 10 bits are reserved for the host address. In addition, routing prefix can also be represented using the subnet mask. 255.255.252.0 (11111111.11111111.11111100.00000000) is the subnet mask for 192.60.128.0/22. Separating the network portion and the subnet portion of an IP address is done by performing a bitwise AND operation between the IP address and the subnet mask. This would result in identifying the network prefix and the host identifier.

What is Supernetting?

Supernetting is the process of combining several IP networks with a common network prefix. Supernetting was introduced as a solution to the problem of increasing size in routing tables. Supernetting also simplifies the routing process. For example, the subnetworks 192.60.2.0/24 and 192.60.3.0/24 can be combined in to the supernetwork denoted by 192.60.2.0/23. In the supernet, the first 23 bits are the network part of the address and the other 9 bits are used as the host identifier. So, one address will represent several small networks and this would reduce the number of entries that should be included in the routing table. Typically, supernetting is used for class C IP addresses (addresses beginning with 192 to 223 in decimal), and most of the routing protocols support supernetting. Examples of such protocols are Border Gateway Protocol (BGP) and Open Shortest Path First (OSPF). But, protocols such as Exterior Gateway Protocol (EGP) and the Routing Information Protocol (RIP) do not support supernetting.

What is the Difference between Subnetting and Supernetting?

Subnetting is the process of dividing an IP network in to sub divisions called subnets whereas, Supernetting is the process of combining several IP networks with a common network prefix. Supernetting will reduce the number of entries in a routing table and also will simplify the routing process. In subnetting, host ID bits (for IP addresses from a single network ID) are borrowed to be used as a subnet ID, while in supernetting, bits from the network ID are borrowed to be used as the host ID.

 

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iBoot and MultiBeast Install Mac OS X on Intel-based PC

iBoot and MultiBeast Install Mac OS X on Intel-based PC

iBoot + MultiBeast: Install Mac OS X on any Intel-based PC

iBoot and MultiBeast Install Mac OS X on any Intel-based PC

iBoot and MultiBeast Install Mac OS X on Intel-based PC

this article have been copied from this source

Any OSx86 installation guide can seem daunting at first glance, especially when trying to remember cryptic terminal commands and sorting through volumes of misinformation on the web.  This guide requires no coding, terminal work, or Mac experience of any kind.  You will not need access to a Mac.  In fact, it’s easier and faster for me to install Snow Leopard with fully working components on my system than it is to install Windows 7.  And more fun.

The iBoot + MultiBeast method is designed and tested for any desktop or laptop running the latest line of Intel processors, the Core i3/i5/i7s.  I have had reports of success with older machines as well including CoreDuo, Core2Duo, and even Pentium 4.  However, AMD processors are not supported.

YOU WILL NEED

  • A computer running an Intel Processor
  • A blank CD
  • A Mac OS X Snow Leopard Retail DVD
  • To leave any fear of your computer at the door.
  • Patience and humility- it may not work out perfectly the first time- but with enough tenacity and grit, you’ll reach the promised land.  It’s easy to get frustrated, but don’t give up!  There are a community of users with similar hardware in the tonymacx86 Forum to provide support if you get stuck.

BEFORE YOU BEGIN

  • Use only 1 graphics card in the 1st PCIe slot with 1 monitor plugged in.
  • Remove any hard drives besides the blank drive being used for OS X.
  • Remove any USB peripherals besides keyboard and mouse.
  • Remove any PCI cards besides graphics- they may not be Mac compatible.
  • It’s best to use an empty hard drive– you will have to partition and format the drive.
  • Always back up any of your important data.

STEP 1: BIOS SETTINGS
You will need to set your BIOS to ACHI mode and your Boot Priority to boot from CD-ROM first.  This is the most important step, and one many people overlook.  Make sure your bios settings match these.  It’s not difficult- the only thing I did on my Gigabyte board besides setting Boot Priority to CD/DVD first was set Optimized Defaults, change SATA to AHCI mode, and set HPET to 64-bit mode.


STEP 2: INSTALL MAC OS X 

In order to boot the Mac OS X Retail DVD, you’ll need to download and burn iBoot.  For desktops and laptops using unsupported Intel CPUs and graphics, a legacy version of iBoot can be downloaded here. If you have an Ivy Bridge or Haswell system, you can’t use the default iBoot. Use iBoot Ivy Bridge or iBoot Haswell.

    1. Download iBoot
    2. Burn the image to CD
    3. Place iBoot in CD/DVD drive
    4. Restart computer
    5. At boot prompt, eject iBoot
    6. Insert your Mac OS X Snow Leopard Retail DVD and press F5
    7. When you see the screen below, press enter to begin the boot process
    1. When you get to the installation screen, open Utilities/Disk Utility.  NOTE: If you cannot get to the installation screen, retry from Step 4, type PCIRootUID=1 before hitting enter. If that doesn’t work then try PCIRootUID=1 -x or just -x which will enter Mac OS X Safe Mode and will allow you to proceed. For some graphics cards, use GraphicsEnabler=No boot flag to proceed. 
    2. Partition your hard drive to GUID Partition Table
    3. Format your hard drive to Mac OS Extended (Journaled).   NOTE: The bootloader can only boot from a disk or partition of 1 TB or less.  Partition larger drives.
    4. For the purposes of this guide, name it Snow Leopard.  You can rename it later.
    5. Close Disk Utility
    6. When the installer asks you where to install, choose Snow Leopard
    7. Choose Customize‚ and uncheck additional options.  This will hasten the install process.  You can always install this stuff later.
    8. Restart computer.
    9. Place iBoot back in drive.
    10. When you get to the boot selection screen, choose your new Snow Leopard installation.
  1. View the super-cool Mac OS X Snow Leopard Welcome Video, and set up your computer!

STEP 3: UPDATE TO 10.6.8
If you have a Sandy Bridge system, please follow these specialized instructions to update to 10.6.8.

    1. Open Finder and navigate to your Snow Leopard drive.
    2. Download the Mac OS X 10.6.8 Combo Update
    3. Download MultiBeast
    4. Open MultiBeast– don’t run it yet, just leave it open.  Set up windows as shown.
  1. Mount MacOSXUpdCombo10.6.8.dmg
  2. Install MacOSXUpdCombo10.6.8.pkg
  3. Upon completion, the installer will ask you to reboot.  DO NOT REBOOT.
  4. Switch to the already open MultiBeast.  If it closes, just re-open it.

STEP 4: MULTIBEAST

MultiBeast is an all-in-one post-installation tool designed to enable boot from hard drive, and install support for Audio, Network, and Graphics. It contains two different complete post-installation solutions: EasyBeast and UserDSDT.  In addition it includes System Utilities to rebuild caches and repair permissions and a collection of drivers, boot loaders, boot time config files and handy software.

Choose one of the following options directly following a fresh installation and update:  

EasyBeast is a DSDT-free solution for any Core/Core2/Core i system. It installs all of the essentials to allow your system to boot from the hard drive. Audio, Graphics and Network will have to be enabled separately.  

UserDSDT is a bare-minimum solution for those who have their own pre-edited DSDT. Place your DSDT.aml on the desktop before install. Audio, Graphics and Network will have to be enabled separately.  HINT: Check the DSDT Database for a pre-edited DSDT.

    1. Run MultiBeast.
    2. If you have a custom DSDT that’s been edited, place the file on your desktop and choose UserDSDT.
    3. All others select EasyBeast 
    4. Select System Utilities.
    5. Optionally, you may install further drivers via Advanced Options to enable ethernet, sound, graphics, etc…  Be sure to read the documentation provided about each installation option.  NOTE: EasyBeast, and UserDSDT install the bootloader by default, so you’ll not need to check that option.
  1. Install to Snow Leopard– it should take about 4 minutes to run scripts.
  2. Eject iBoot.
  3. Reboot- from your new Snow Leopard installation drive.
If your drive doesn’t boot on its own, and you get an error referencing boot0, fix it using the methods listed here.

Congratulations!  You’re done!!

Your PC is now fully operational, while running the latest version of Mac OS X Snow Leopard!  And you have a nice Boot CD to get into your system in case things go awry.  Boot your system from iBoot if you have issues.  You may run MultiBeast as often as you like.

If you can’t boot, try typing -x at the boot prompt to enter safe mode, or just boot with iBoot.  When you get to the desktop, you can make all of the changes you need to.  The best way to start fresh is delete whatever you’re trying to get rid of- including the whole /Extra folder, as most kexts are installed there.  Then you can re-run MultiBeast.  As long as you rebuild caches and repair permissions after you’re done, you can do just about anything you want to /Extra/Extensions and /System/Library/Extensions.  Anything can be tweaked and enabled upon subsequent uses of MultiBeast.

If you’ve had success using iBoot + MultiBeast, consider a contribution to help keep the sites going.  We’re constantly updating and tweaking our tools to help you.

Thanks in advance!

-tonymacx86 & MacMan

For our most current workarounds and solutions for issues such as USB and audio, check out the Mac OS X 10.6.3 Update Mac OS X 10.6.4 Update,  Mac OS X 10.6.5 UpdateMac OS X 10.6.6 Update, Mac OS X 10.6.7 Update, and Mac OS X 10.6.8 Update articles. Good luck, and see you on the forum!

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